How religious groups voted in the midterm elections

By Elizabeth Podrebarac Sciupac and Gregory A. Smith of Pew Research

A preliminary analysis of the 2018 midterm elections finds considerable continuity in the voting patterns of several key religious groups.

  • 17% of voters were religiously unaffiliated, up from 12% in 2014 and 2010.
  • White evangelical or born-again Christians backed Republican candidates for the U.S. House of Representatives at about the same rate they did in 2014.
  • Religiously unaffiliated voters (also known as religious “nones”) and Jewish voters once again backed Democratic candidates by large margins.

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About Radnor Reports

Ken Feltman is past-president of the International Association of Political Consultants and the American League of Lobbyists. He is retired chairman of Radnor Inc., an international political consulting and government relations firm in Washington, D.C. Know as a coalition builder, he has participated in election campaigns and legislative efforts in the United States and several other countries.
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