When To Trust A Story That Uses Unnamed Sources

By Perry Bacon Jr. of FiveThirtyEight –

The various investigations into the Trump administration and its alleged ties to Russia are hard to follow. The allegations are sometimes muddled, the probes are still ongoing, and all sides in the dispute are leaking information that favors their points of view.

These stories are also hard to follow because few officials are willing to put their names behind their claims and comments, leading to a stream of stories rife with unnamed sources.

What’s a reader to do? Well, here’s a guide to unnamed sources in government/politics/Washington stories — who they are, how reporters use them, and how to tell if you should trust what they say.

Continue reading…

About Radnor Reports

Ken Feltman is past-president of the International Association of Political Consultants and the American League of Lobbyists. He is retired chairman of Radnor Inc., an international political consulting and government relations firm in Washington, D.C. Know as a coalition builder, he has participated in election campaigns and legislative efforts in the United States and several other countries.
This entry was posted in Crisis communication, Democracy, Donald Trump, Fake news, FBI, FiveThirtyEight, Geopolitical, government, Internet, Journalism, Politics, Putin, Robert Mueller, Russia, Social Media, Technology, Ukraine, United States, White House. Bookmark the permalink.